WEEK_5_Ethnical Evaluation of Weeks 1-5

WEEK_5_Ethnical Evaluation of Weeks 1-5
If I were to summarize the topics covered thus far, this class emphasizes artistic expression within a broad compression of digital and technological history.  This class first covered the relationship between art and sciences, and then developed the growing influence of science in art.  The topics of simple perspective in drawing, to robots, and to potential artificial intelligence have shown the strong influences of sciences and technology within art.  While CP Snow’s “Cultural Rift” claims the two are separate entities and have separated two intellect bodies, the rest of the class has strongly refuted his argument.  Desma 9’s first week introduced a cultural problem, but the rest of the class seems to be proving it’s own thesis wrong. Art and science are intimately connected and are inevitably intertwined.  The real “cultural debate” is not if there is a split between the intellects, but how far will technology alter the definition of art, humanities, and even life forms.
Some of the worlds earliest art only evolved with the help of the mathematical studies.  Perspective and vanishing point are merely a mathematical formula of how things look from a distance. Every single lecture following the first week pointed out the growing connection and relationship between the humanities department and the art department.  This trend continues with the abstract expression of the 4th dimension, robots, industrialization, artificial intelligence, and even human art and plastic surgery.
The Analects of Confucius, by Simon Leys, is a Confucius based work that argues imminently against Snow’s thesis.  This book passionately supports politics and the ideals of a civilization of the past ages, essentially saying there are no two cultures competing for society’s intellects.  However, this book laments the loss of some of civilization’s past ethics and beliefs.  This is the main downside or danger of the advancing technologies and sciences.  The definition of dehumanization is as follows, “the act of degrading people with respect to their best qualities.” Is this now happening to us now?
We discussed this topic several times in discussion, but is a robot dancing really dancing? Is a machine created painting really a painting?  In the past, art was highly valued as a specialized, unique form of expression.  Artisans were very important to a cities culture and society.  This trend is fading away.  While in a previous blog I mentioned the benefits of technology in art, which included a mass spreading of beautification, I believe such influx of art has drastically altered the value of arts.  The most important thing in such a morphing society is now the hindrance of the change, but rather, an education to appreciate and understand the changes and trends. Advances in technology will inevitably bring good in live saving medications, operations, and entertainment, so stopping its progress is not only impossible, it is foolhardy.

too many posters?

too many posters?

Unethical Plastic Surgury?

Unethical Plastic Surgury?

Too many posters?
This is why I have based my project on educating participants about altering visuals and health issues.  My project, which lets people step into a fatter or skinnier version of their own bodies, can also educate people about obesity and anorexia, and encourage people to change their health habits.  More importantly, this device shows the fickleness of human perspective and the human desire to like the immediate.  Being able to step into an alternate form of ones own body can help one realize their own plight (of say, obesity) and aim for something that they once had.

BY: Jason Kwok

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