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Project 4


Due Monday, 11 June

Write one 1024 x 768 pixel Processing application to complete Project 4. This project will not be uploaded to the class server; it will be demonstrated during a final critique on 11 June.

This project allows for a great deal of freedom, but also has constraints. The interface and display are the constraints. Over the last nine weeks, we've been working with the constraint of using the mouse and keyboard as input devices and the screen as the output. For this project, instead of using the mouse/keyboard for the interface, you will use a computer vision system that allows two people to control the software at the same time. Each person has their own "cursor" that responds to a light and each person's control is constrained to one half of the screen (left or right). The software will be projected onto the wall and the people will stand in front of the projection to control it.

The content for the project is open within the context of Krueger's text. He talks about the different ways to think about interactive software. For example, it can encourage dialog, amplify human gestures, create a space to explore, serve as an instrument, create a space for narrative, visualize the unseen, and can encourage play. Select one of these areas as a starting point, but you have complete freedom over the content beyond that. Think closely about the interaction between the two people, as well as between each person and the software.

Follow these steps:
1. Make paper thumbnail sketches for at least 10 different ideas
2. Make refined drawings from sketches (on paper or in software)
3. Create rough media elements (drawings, photographs, generative graphics, etc.)
4. Realize the sequence in code, isolate each element and add one by one
5. Complete a prototype program.
6. Refine the media elements and code

Complete steps 1-5 by Monday. On that day, be prepared to explain your concept and show your work-in-progress.




Exercise M, N, O

Exercise M due Wednesday, 23 May
Exercise N, O due Monday, 30 May

Required Reading:
Data 4, Image 2, Typography 2, Typography 3, Image 3, Color 2, Image 4, Image 5, Output 1

Write one Processing program to complete exercises N and O. Each program must be 400 x 400 pixels in dimension. Explore ideas and compositions on paper and/or software tools such as Photoshop and Illustrator before beginning to code. The programs must be uploaded to the server at the beginning of class on the 30th.

M. Read Chapter 5 of Myron Krueger's Artificial Reality II entitled "Artificial Reality: A New Aesthetic Medium". What does "Response is the Medium!" mean? Express your thoughts in 250 words.

N. Load a sequence of 12 images into an array and use the mouse position to control their sequence and display time.

O. Use arrays and for structures to control the motion of one hundred shapes.




Project 3: Computer Holding Power


Due Monday, 21 May

Write one 600 x 400 pixel Processing program to complete Project 3.

The individuals presented in Turkle's text all used games/software as a way to escape and/or alter their self-perception. Using the ideas in that text as a starting point, write a piece of software that explores your personal fantasy for escape and/or transformation. In your realization, concentrate on the qualities of motion and response.

Follow these steps:
1. Make paper thumbnail sketches for at least 10 different ideas
2. Make refined drawings from sketches (on paper or in software)
3. Create rough media elements (drawings, photographs, generative graphics, etc.)
4. Realize the sequence in code, isolate each element and add one by one
5. Refine the media elements and code

Complete steps 1-3 by Wednesday. On that day, be prepared to explain your concept, show your sketches, and to talk about your ideas for writing the code.



Exercise J, K, L

Exercise J due Wednesday, 9 May
Exercise K, L due Monday, 14 May

Required Reading:
Math 3, Math 4, Transform 1, Transform 2, Motion 1, Motion 2

Write one Processing program to complete exercises K and L. Each program must be 400 x 400 pixels in dimension. Explore ideas and compositions on paper and/or software tools such as Photoshop and Illustrator before beginning to code. The programs must be uploaded to the server at the beginning of class on the 14th.

J. Read Video Games and Computer Holding Power, written by Sherry Turkle in 1984. What are some of the properties of software that make it different from the "real world?" How do these properties begin to explain the psychological effects of software as introduced by Turkle. Express your thoughts in 250 words.

K. Move a 60 pixel diameter white ellipse on a solid black background from coordinate (100, 200) to coordinate(300,200).

L. Animate two visual elements/shapes/mechanisms/organisms of your own design. Give one a distinctly mechanical motion and give the other an organic motion.




Project 2: Testing... 1,2,3


Due Monday, 7 May

Required Viewing:
Watch the videos from Doug Engelbart, Bill Atkinson, Bill Verplank, and Gillian Crampton Smith

Write one 600 x 400 pixel Processing program to complete Project 2.

Write a program to test your classmates. How much do they know about American History? What are their personality types? How many times can they click the mouse in three seconds? These are basic examples, what are more interesting tests?

There must be an introduction screen, at least three questions/challenges, and then a summary screen that gives the participant the results of the test. There is a sample program for keyboard interaction and one for mouse interaction. These programs are intentionally basic and plain, you'll need to do much better.

Follow these steps:
1. Make paper thumbnail sketches for at least 10 different ideas
2. Make refined drawings from sketches (on paper or in software)
3. Create rough media elements (drawings, photographs, generative graphics, etc.)
4. Realize the sequence in code, isolate each element and add one by one
5. Refine the media elements and code

Complete steps 1-3 by Wednesday. On that day, be prepared to explain your concept, show your sketches, and to talk about your ideas for writing the code.




Exercise G, H, I


Due Monday, 30 April

Required Reading:
Input 3, Input 4, Input 5, Structure 3, Shape 3, Development 2

Write one Processing program to complete each exercise. All programs must be 400 x 400 pixels in dimension. For each exercise, explore ideas and compositions on paper and/or software tools such as Photoshop and Illustrator before beginning to code. The programs must be uploaded to the server at the beginning of class on the 30th.

G. Use code 26-08 as a base to write a program that asks a question, receives a response from the keyboard, and then responds.

H. Use the code introduced in Input 2,3, and 4 to create a relationship between the mouse and a white circle. Imbue the circle with a personality that is revealed as the mouse is moved in different ways (fast, slow, up, down, clicking rapidly, etc.) Incorporate the mousePressed(), mouseReleased(), mouseMoved(), and mouseDragged() functions.

I. Create a function that draws a fish. Use two parameters to change the shape and features of the fish and two additional parameters to set its position. Using your function, draw nine fish in the display window in a regular 3 x 3 matrix. Use different parameters for each fish drawn to give each a unique shape and features.




Project 1: Transformation


Due Monday, 23 April

Required Reading:
Math 2

Write one 600 x 400 pixel Processing program to complete Project 1.

Create a continuous transition from one image, scene, or form to another. For example, transform Dr. Jekyll into Mr. Hyde, transform a sheet of paper into a paper airplane, or transform the light and shadow of a landscape as the sun sets. These examples are very basic examples; you should strive for fresh, inventive ideas. Your transformation should evoke a response in the audience; it can be funny, thoughtful, provocative, etc.

Use the change in the mouseX variable as the cursor moves left and right as the only catalyst for change. Animation should not be continuous, but rely soley on the mouse movements.

Follow these steps:
1. Make paper thumbnail sketches for at least 10 different ideas
2. Make refined drawings from sketches (on paper or in software)
3. Create rough media elements (drawings, photographs, generative graphics, etc.)
4. Realize the sequence in code, isolate each element and add one by one
5. Refine the media elements and code

Complete steps 1-3 by Wednesday. On that day, be prepared to explain your concept, show your sketches, and to talk about your ideas for writing the code.




Exercise D, E, F


Exercise D due Wednesday, 11 April
Exercise E, F due Monday, 16 April

Required Reading:
Image 1, Data 2, Data 3, Typography 1, Development 1, Structure 2, Input 1, Drawing 1, Input 2

Write one Processing program to complete exercises E and F. All programs must be 400 x 400 pixels in dimension. For each exercise, explore ideas and compositions on paper and/or software tools such as Photoshop and Illustrator before beginning to code. The programs must be uploaded to the server at the beginning of class on the 16th.

D. Read the Personal Dynamic Media essay written by Kay and Goldberg in 1977. Has the original vision of the Dynabook been realized? In 250 words, explain why you think it has or has not. Be specific.

E. Make a custom drawing tool that creates a different quality of marks when the mouse is pressed and not pressed. What is your drawing tool designed for? How does the types of drawings it encourages reflect its intent?

F. Create an alphabet book from A to G, with each "page" triggered by the keyboard. Use typography and images to illustrate each letter. How can you make the images unique to your personality and point of view. Consider using the mouse to animate each letter's vignette.



Exercise A, B, C

Exercise A due Wednesday, 4 April
Exercise B, C due Monday, 9 April

Required Reading:
Processing..., Using Processing, Structure 1, Shape 1, Data 1, Math 1, Control 1, Control 2, Shape 2, Color 1

Write one Processing program to complete exercises B and C. All programs must be 400 x 400 pixels in dimension. For each exercise, explore ideas and compositions on paper and/or software tools such as Photoshop and Illustrator before beginning to code. The programs must be uploaded to the server at the beginning of class on the 9th.

A. Write a 250—350 word response to this question: "How are technologies that enable interactions between people and machines changing our culture?" Don't use generalizations exclusively, provide one or more specific examples. We'll discuss your answer at the beginning of class on Wednesday. Hand in your response on an 8.5 x 11 inch sheet of paper. Here are some additional questions to consider: What is a computer? What is a personal computer? How do you use computers in your life? When were computers first used in making images? How have computers changed the arts?

B. Select and draw an area from Paul Klee's Monument in Fertile Country, Conqueror, or Woman in Peasant Dress. Download the image and exploring various cropping options before beginning to code. Both Photoshop and Illustrator are useful tools for selecting colors and determining angles and coordinates.

C. Using only grayscale values, develop an abstract pattern reflecting the structure of one of your favorite songs. Use three or more “for” structures. Include comments in your program explaining which song you selected and how you interpreted its sonic structures into visual patterns.